The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region announced on Monday that it will enact temporary closures and fire restrictions due to dangerous fire conditions across the state.

“Most of California remains under the threat of unprecedented and dangerous fire conditions with a combination of extreme heat, significant wind events, dry conditions, and firefighting resources that are stretched to the limit,” a press release from the forest service reads. “Due to these conditions, the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region is announcing the following temporary closures and fire restrictions to provide for public safety and reduce the potential for human-caused fire starts.”

The temporary closures and fire restrictions will go into effect at 5 p.m. on Monday, and include the closures of the Stanislaus, Sierra, Sequoia, Inyo, Los Padres, Angeles, San Bernardino and Cleveland national forests.

Additionally, the use of any ignition sources, including campfires and gas stoves, will be prohibited on National Forest System lands, and all developed campgrounds and day-use sites will be closed in national forests throughout the state.

“The wildfire situation throughout California is dangerous and must be taken seriously. Existing fires are displaying extreme fire behavior, new fire starts are likely, weather conditions are worsening, and we simply do not have enough resources to fully fight and contain every fire,” said Randy Moore, regional forester for the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region, in the press release. “We are bringing every resource to bear nationally and internationally to fight these fires, but until conditions improve, and we are confident that National Forest visitors can recreate safely, the priority is always to protect the public and our firefighters. With these extreme conditions, these temporary actions will help us do both.”

For the full press release click here.

Fore more information, visit fs.usda.gov/R5.

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Reporter

Noah Berner has lived in Calaveras County most of his life, and graduated from University of California, Santa Cruz with a degree in history.

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