The summer solstice marks the longest day and shortest night of the year in the northern

Hemisphere. The modern scientific word “solstice” originates from the Latin word “solstitium,” used in the Roman Republic in the 1st century BCE, formed from “sol,” meaning sun, and “stitium,” meaning stoppage.

Why stoppage? Because, from the point of view of the earth, on this day the sun stops moving north in the sky and begins to move south. This is an important day for plants, as the shortening of the days prompts many of them to begin fruiting.

Throughout time eternal, human cultures have celebrated the summer solstice. In Slavic countries, the celebration is called Kupala Night. On this shortest night of the year, circular

dances honor the role of water in fertility, while daytime activities venerate the giver of all energy, the sun.

Here, on the threshold of summer, I hear my father’s words: “We can all find solace in the solstice if we stand still with our supplier of energy and draw in what appears around us. It is a time to mesh our being—mind, body, and soul—with everything. It is a time to connect, feel and live. Now is a time for love and peace. We all need that.” The future starts now.

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