There are some things to consider in these confusing times that could help some readers with decisions they might make in early November. The following are some books that seem to have relatively common themes:

“Fear: Trump in the White House” by Bob Woodward;

“Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House” by Michael Wolff;

“The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir” by John Bolton;

“A Warning” by Anonymous;

“Unhinged: An Insider’s Account of the Trump White House” by Omarosa Manigault Newman;

“A Very Stable Genius: Donald J. Trump’s Testing of America” by Carol Leoning and Philip Rucker;

“Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man” by Mary L. Trump Ph.D.;

“A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership” by James Comey;

“Disloyal: A Memoir: The True Story of the Former Personal Attorney to President Donald J. Trump” by Michael Cohen;

“It’s Even Worse Than You Think: What the Trump Administration is Doing to America” by David Cay Johnston;

“Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donld Trump and the Nationalist Uprising” by Joshua Green;

“Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic” by David Frum;

“Team of Vipers: My 500 Extraordinary Days in the Trump White House” by Cliff Sims;

“The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President” by Bandy X. Lee;

“Trump Revealed: An American Journey of Ambition, Ego, Money and Power” by Marc Fisher and Michael Kranish;

“Donald Trump Vs United States: Inside the Struggle to Stop a President” by Michael Schmidt;

This is not, by any means, a complete listing of books about our current president, because there have been lots and lots of books, with estimates ranging from 4,500 to 121. As you can see this is a completely moving target, so my estimate of lots and lots will have to do. I would also point out that books have been published that may have a positive view of Mr. Trump – of the 30 books I found, seven were written by the president himself and one by his son Donald Trump Jr.

Motivation for writing books can be monetary, fear-based, vengeful, political or confessional. Given what I have observed and experienced, my writings tend to be fear-based because I think America is a noble experiment that is quickly going to disintegrate if the current president is given four more years to do the bidding of Putin, Xi and all the other dictators that he seems to admire.

I personally love the First Amendment: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” So, in no way am I advocating for censorship of any of these books. The freedom of press, speech and assembly are essential to our country continuing as a democracy. Period.

If Trump supporters love our country as much as they say, it seems that they would pay attention to the themes of all these books. Here are some of the words that should stand out: “fear,” “warning,” “unhinged,” “disloyal,” “devil’s bargain,” “Trumpocracy,” “corruption,” “team of vipers,” “dangerous case,” “ambition,” “ego,” “money” and “power.”

Unfortunately, right now his supporters seem to be “nose blind” (thank you Febreze for this image), or perhaps “fact blind” or “truth blind” would be more accurate – although the smells emanating from the White House are pretty “fishy.”

Final thought: the last book mentioned, “Donald Trump Vs United States: Inside the Struggle to Stop a President” by Michael Schmidt brings the really sobering thought that there has been no counterintelligence investigation into Trump’s ties to Russia. I wonder why. Don’t you?

Kevin Wychopen is a semi-retired school counselor and columnist for the Enterprise. Contact him at itsabigworld@live.com.

Kevin Wychopen is a semi-retired school counselor and weekly columnist for the Enterprise. Contact him at itsabigworld@live.com.

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