Editor,

In his recent letter to the editor, Mr. Avalos infers that there was no issue with the Electoral College when Obama and Clinton were elected with it. No kidding, ALL presidents win via the Electoral College, but he neglects to mention that they also won the popular vote, and that is the difference here.

In our history there have been only five presidents that have won elections while losing the popular vote, all were Republicans. Trump in 2016 and Bush in 2000. The other three were in the 1800s. Like it or not, the Electoral College is written in our Constitution. In 2016 Trump lost the popular vote by nearly three million votes, and in 2000 Bush lost the popular vote by more than 500,000 votes. Both became president.

I find it interesting that many of the industrialized nations of the world have modeled their laws similar to our Constitution with the exception of the Electoral College, where they prefer that popular vote be the determining factor. I understand his argument about populated states, but that has been offset by the Constitution, which calls for only two senators per state regardless of population, while the House of Representatives is based on population. Therefore, less populous states are over represented in the Senate, while more populous states are under represented, achieving the balance that the founders were trying to achieve. The founders knew what they were doing!

Given the choice, most states would prefer Senate control over House control of our government. Unfortunately in today’s world it seems that the Senate is where most legislation goes to die.

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