Not long ago, the news site ProPublica published an important story about employers who, in their quest for a younger and cheaper workforce, were pushing out “older” workers – often those in their early 50s. Crunching data from the Urban Institute, reporters found that 28 percent of stable, longtime employees sustain at least one damaging layoff between turning 50 and leaving the workforce for retirement.

While the story was about the financial impacts on laid-off workers’ savings and retirement, it was also about a lot more. It was also about health care – the kind those workers would be able to afford during their forced early retirement and then during their more traditional retirement after age 65.

0
0
0
0
0

Comment Policy

Calaveras Enterprise does not actively monitor comments. However, staff does read through to assess reader interest. When abusive or foul language is used or directed toward other commenters, those comments will be deleted. If a commenter continues to use such language, that person will be blocked from commenting. We wish to foster a community of communication and a sharing of ideas, and we truly value readers' input.